101 on Taipei Food

Asia, food

The best of all worlds – maybe the best way to describe Taiwanese cuisine.

A diverse culture mixed with rich soil and good weather brings all sorts of delicacies from various (mainland) Chinese provinces, Japan and Southeast Asia. Taiwan claims to have improved and perfected them all. Taiwan is the place to go to get an Asian cuisine’s best of.

Immigrants from China contribute the most by promoting their best food items from “back home”, while Japan’s influence stems from Japan’s rule over the island. Its influence can also be seen in other aspects of Taiwanese life.

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胡椒饼 // peppered pork bun

Street food culture is big and night markets a popular spot for both tourists and locals. Stalls overflowing with tropical fruit show off Taiwan’s good climate while a lot of stalls emphasize its rich ressources of seafood.

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宁夏夜市 // Ningxia Street Market

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seafood – streetfood

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kebabs

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oysters and eggs – Taiwanese surf & turf

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street market

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臭豆腐 // stinky tofu – a classic

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释迦 // sugarapples resemble a buddha’s head

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卤肉饭 // pork over rice

小笼包 // soup dumpling is one of the items that many areas claim for themselves. Taiwanese soup dumplings can definitely hold their own – and the price is much more affordable than these ones.

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小笼包 // soup dumplings

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Taipei fish market

Taipei fish market is one of the places influenced by the Japanese. Sushi, sashimi and all the trimmings can be found here as well as king crabs and its smaller cousins ready to serve and ready to eat. Definitely a more high end place to eat, but pleasant to look at (compare this place in Lyon).

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crab & wine @ Taipei fish market

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fresh seafood

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shrimps

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hotpot platter – hotpot is another popular food choice, this restaurant serves a mix of Chinese hotpot and Japanese shabu shabu

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ready for hotpot

Ok this last one is not for eats – but it shows the importance of food and the cleverness of the artist. Using the coloration of the jade perfectly to create a true masterpiece. Its counterpiece – a stone resembling a piece of cooked pork, was currently elsewhere.

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not for eats – jade cabbage at 故宫 // Gugong Museum

      December 18th – December 24th 2016

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